Mouse Over to Stop Rotation & Read Ad

Tuesday, January 5, 2016

Duke Study Associates Shale Drilling with Lower Home Values in Some Places, Higher Values in Others

From Duke Today:
Home values decline steeply when fracking occurs in neighborhoods that use well water, says new research from Duke University. But the outcome differs in neighborhoods that rely on piped water, where home values rise slightly after shale-gas drilling occurs. 
The study, conducted in Pennsylvania, found that in areas using well water, home prices dropped by an average of $30,1676 when shale drilling occurred within a distance of 1.5 kilometers. Meanwhile, homes using piped water gained an average of $4,800 in value after shale wells opened nearby. 
Hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” is a relatively new technology in which gas is extracted by drilling into a shale formation and then applying a high-pressure mixture of water, sand and chemicals to create cracks from which the underground gas stores are released.

The paper is among the first to quantify the impact of fracking on property values in a wide geographic area, said co-author Christopher Timmins, a Duke economics professor who specializes in environmental economics. It appears online in the December issue of the American Economic Review
“Our results show clearly that housing markets are responding to homeowners’ concerns about groundwater contamination from shale gas development,” Timmins said. “We may not know for many years whether these concerns are valid or not. However, they are creating a real cost to property owners today.”
Click here to read more.

View the study report below:




Connect with us on Facebook and Twitter!

No comments :

Post a Comment

Follow by Email