Friday, January 11, 2013

Fracktivist Attempts to Discredit FrackNation For Not Having Industry Backing

Often in the fracking debate a pro-fracking video, report, or article is picked apart by those opposed to fracking in an attempt to find and point out any sort of industry connection.  The obvious point being that if there is backing from the oil and gas industry, there is no possibility of objectivity and the report should be discredited.

Meanwhile, fracktivists enjoy the perception - which has been perpetuated by the media - that the fight against gas drilling is a "grassroots" effort, despite the fact that the vast majority of reports and studies that have attempted to demonize the industry receive funding from deep-pocketed environmental organizations that are opposed to development of fossil fuels.

That's why I found it amusing to see Dory Hippauf, a devoted critic of the oil and gas industry, attempt to discredit the new pro-fracking documentary FrackNation by bringing up the fact that it was funded through a grassroots effort and not backed by industry.  It seems an interesting and ironic line of reasoning, coming from a fracktivist.

From her blog posting on shaleshockmedia.org:
This brings up another thing troubling me about the “movie”.  The funding was supposedly done through Kickstarter, raising financing with “grassroots” backers.   Why?  With EID/IPAA’s latest blog post I would think a “movie” like FrackNation should have had major studio’s trampling each other to get a piece and be on the list for an Oscar.  But nope, nothing.
Other than the aforementioned EID/IPAA blog post, there has been little public relations to push the “movie” from major Natural Gas interests.   Where’s the Exxon-Mobil logo?  Where’s Aubrey McClendon telling us not to miss this blockbuster?  Nada.  As far as I know, not even the Marcellus Shale Coalition is running a commercial before the “movie”.
I haven't seen the movie, and for all I know it could be a compelling masterpiece or a complete mess - although from what I've seen I tend to expect that it is well-made and 100% pro-fracking through and through.  But just an observation after reading this is that Dory's argument ignores the fact that one of the stated points of grassroots funding for FrackNation was to show that the fracking debate isn't as simple as industry versus the average man, but that there were plenty of normal, everyday people who not only do not oppose gas drilling but actually would speak up and fight for the process because of the benefits they have experienced from shale development.

You can read the rest of the posting here, where she also criticizes the movie for spelling frack with a "k" and encourages users to flag the YouTube video advertising FrackNation for whatever reason they like best.

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